Charleston Shooter Was On Suboxone, A Drug Linked To Violence

The Charleston shooter, Dylann Storm Roof, was prescribed the pharmaceutical drug Suboxone, a drug that has dangerous side-effects that include outbursts of violence and aggression.

Much like other lone-wolf mass-shooting incidents, being prescribed pharmaceutical drugs and having bizarre personality defects leading up to and following the incident, seem to play a major role.

Could Dylann Storm Roof be the latest victim of dangerous psychiatric drugs or mind-control style NLP therapy, much like James Holmes has been reported to be? reports:

A user on the MD Junction website relates how her husband “became violent, smashing things and threatening me,” after just a few days of coming off suboxone.

Another poster on the website tells the story of how his personality completely changed as a result of taking suboxone.

The individual relates how he became “nasty” and “violent” just weeks into taking the drug, adding that he would “snap” and be mean to people for no reason.

Another poster reveals how his son-in-law “completely changed on suboxone,” and that the drug sent him into “self-destruct mode.”

A user named ‘Jhalloway’ also tells the story of how her husband’s addiction to suboxone was “ruining our life.”

A poster on a separate forum writes about how he became “horribly aggressive” towards his partner after taking 8mg of suboxone.

A website devoted to horror stories about the drug called also features a post by a woman whose husband obtained a gun and began violently beating his 15-year-old son after taking suboxone.

According to a Courier-Journal report, suboxone “is increasingly being abused, sold on the streets and inappropriately prescribed” by doctors. For some users, it is even more addictive than the drugs it’s supposed to help them quit.

As we previously highlighted, virtually every major mass shooter was taking some form of SSRI or other pharmaceutical drug at the time of their attack, including Columbine killer Eric Harris, ‘Batman’ shooter James Holmes and Sandy Hook gunman Adam Lanza.

As the website SSRI Stories profusely documents, there are literally hundreds of examples of mass shootings, murders and other violent episodes that have been committed by individuals on psychiatric drugs over the past three decades.

Pharmaceutical giants who produce drugs like Zoloft, Prozac and Paxil spend around $2.4 billion dollars a year on direct-to-consumer television advertising every year. By running negative stories about prescription drugs, networks risk losing tens of millions of dollars in ad revenue, which is undoubtedly one of the primary reasons why the connection is habitually downplayed or ignored entirely.