Traces Of Cocaine In Pharaohs Prove Egyptians Beat Columbus To Americas

Ancient Egyptians visited the Americas as early as 1,000 BC and traded with locals for tobacco and cocaine, a new find suggests.

Christopher Columbus was not the first foreigner to discover the Americas, according to new evidence that suggests ancient Egyptians visited the Americas as early as 1,000 BC and traded with locals for tobacco and cocaine.

German scientist Dr Svetla Balabanova was studying the mummified remains of Lady Henut Taui, a member of the ancient Egyptian ruling class, when she made a surprising discovery – the mummy contained traces of nicotine and cocaine.

Suspicion regarding the findings led to alternative hypotheses, for example, that the tests were contaminated or the mummies were modern fakes, but these ideas were disproved and the mummy and the test results were found to be authentic.

The results were particularly surprising considering that tobacco and coca plants, which were only found in the Americas at the time, were not exported overseas until the Victorian era in the 19th century. Could it be that the ancient Egyptians had made it all the way to America 3,000 years ago?

Epoch Times reports: A number of archaeological discoveries have certainly suggested that the Egyptians were masters of the seas.  In around 1477 BC, Queen Hatshepsut funded a mysterious overseas expedition to the Land of Punt, which is depicted in a relief at Deir el-Bahri (in modern day Luxor).

It shows five ships, each measuring about 70 feet long, carrying 210 men and loaded with gold, trees and exotic animals which can only be found along the coast of Africa and Arabian Peninsula, indicating that the Egyptians were able to undertake fairly large scale oceanic voyages.

Then, in 2011, a series of remarkable discoveries on a stretch of the Red Sea coast proved the Egyptian’s seafaring abilities. Archaeologists excavating a dried-up lagoon, known as Mersa Gawasis, unearthed traces of an ancient harbour that once launched early voyages like Hatshepsut’s onto the open ocean.

Inside a series of man-made caves they found timber, rigging, limestone anchors, steering oars, reed mats, cedar planks, and the remains of the oldest seagoing ships ever discovered, which offers hard proof of the Egyptians’ nautical roots.

Further evidence of an Egyptian journey to the Americas comes from an intriguing but unverified discovery in the Marble Region of the Grand Canyon. According to the Arizona Gazette, on 5th April, 1909, two Smithsonian-funded explorers found a variety of Egyptian-like artefacts including tablets with hieroglyphics inside caves.

However, the Smithsonian Institute has no current records of the finding. Such a discovery would have offered hard evidence of an Egyptian journey to Americas but perhaps it is just too inconvenient to rewrite the history books and alter long-held traditions such as the Columbus Day celebrations.

Baxter Dmitry

Baxter Dmitry

Baxter Dmitry is a writer at Your News Wire. He covers politics, business and entertainment. Speaking truth to power since he learned to talk, Baxter has travelled in over 80 countries and won arguments in every single one. Live without fear.
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Baxter Dmitry
  • guest

    Plants of the Erythroxylon and Nicotiana genus also grow in Africa and on the Arabian Peninsula.

    • Winston Smith

      The Erythroxylon genus is native just to South America, as far as I can tell.

      There is a native African tobacco plant with nicotine.

  • eddivision15

    More likely the just abused it into extinction like they did the Blue Lotus.
    No long trips to South America for cocaine.

  • triangle whip

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tlwW2DKzlc I don’t think they had knowledge to make [coke]..

  • Adam Jackson

    It would be foolish to think the Egyptians couldn’t have made it to South. Or
    North America. They had been sailing for thousands of years and had a good knowledge of the stars and solar system, and how do we know that didn’t have coca trees? And if they didn’t then obviously they traded with the natives. Assuming this isn’t another hocus pocus theory with no proof. Where are the sources for thes findings in the mummies?

    • Dave Kinard

      This would require the Eqyptians making it there and back. It seems pretty far fetched that there was consistent trade occurring.

  • GOP is dead to me

    They used their stargates to travel to the other side of the globe, they didn’t need boats silly!

  • fassler

    Tobacco was exported from the America’s since the 17th century. British aristocracy probably owned the mummies at one time and snorted the coke off of the mummies foreheads.