Greek Referendum: More Than 60% Are saying No

More than 60 percent of Greeks have voted “No” in Sunday’s referendum on the bailout deal and austerity measures

Greece looks to be heading towards a historic no vote against austerity measures.

The official opinion polls showed the no camp on 61% and the yes camp with about 39%

The official projection from Greece’s interior ministry shows no vote set to win with an overwhelming 61% share.

With more than a third of votes counted, results from the Greek referendum suggest voters have rejected the terms of an international bailout.

Over 60 percent of Greeks have voted “No” in Sunday’s referendum on the bailout deal and austerity measures,

About 9.9 million Greeks were eligible to take part in the vote, which had been labeled #Greferendum on social media.

The “No” victory has been predicted by several opinion polls, including GPO, Metron Analysis and MRB, whose polls were released after the end of the voting.

The Guardian report:

If the final result reflects these early figures, it could risk plunging Europe deeper into crisis and would send shockwaves through global financial markets.

While the ballot papers were still being counted, polls conducted by telephone were showing knife-edge results, but all were pointing towards the no vote that the prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, had asked for.

His government has insisted that a no vote will not mean an end to negotiations with the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the European Central Bank over a package of reforms to enable Greece to resume payments to its creditors and reopen its banks.

The Greek finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, told CNBC before the opinion polls were published that the government could get a deal with its creditors within 24 hours.

His view was endorsed by a spokesman for the ruling party who said, after the polls were published, “I think this is guidance for the government”.

It was not clear, however, how such a deal would be put together in a politically charged situation where Tsipras has accused other eurozone leaders of being “extremist conservative forces” while he has been accused of lying to his own population.