Mysterious Unidentified Object At CERN Delays Experiments

Scientists at CERN have been delayed in conducting a number of experiments using the Hadron Collider due to an “unidentified lying object” in the beam pipe of LHC’s 17-mile underground tunnel.

Scientists, as yet, have no idea what this object is or how it got there. 

Physicist Albert De Roeck, one of the scientists working at CERN doesn’t seem too concerned about the mysterious object, saying, “The unidentified lying object turns out not to be a problem for the operation, it’s just something to keep an eye on”. reports:

The world’s largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider made headlines when its global collaboration of thousands of scientists in 2012 observed a new fundamental particle, the Higgs boson. After that, the collider was paused for the extensive upgrade. Much more powerful than before, as part of Run 2 physicists on the Large Hadron Collider’s experiments are analyzing new proton collision data to unravel the structure of the Higgs.

The Large Hadron Collider straddles the border between France and Switzerland. Its first run began in 2009, led by CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, through an international consortium of thousands of scientists.

Particle discoveries unlock mysteries of cosmos, pave way for new technology

The workshop in Dallas, the “2015 International Workshop on Deep-Inelastic Scattering,” draws the world’s leading scientists each year to an international city for nuts and bolts talks that drive the world’s leading-edge physics experiments, such as the Large Hadron Collider.

Going into the second run, De Roeck said physicists will continue to look for anomalies, unexpected decay modes or couplings, multi-Higgs production, or larger decay rates than expected, among other things.

Particle discoveries by physicists resolve mysteries, such as questions surrounding Dark Matter and Dark Energy, and the earliest moments of the Big Bang. But particle discoveries also are ultimately applied to other fields to improve everyday life, such as medical technologies like MRIs and PET scans, which diagnose and treat cancer.

For example, proton therapy is the newest non-invasive, precision scalpel in the fight against cancer, with new centers opening all over the world.