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NASA Footage Reveals A Year On Earth From Space

NASA
NASA has released a time-lapse video showing a year in the life of the planet as seen from Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite which is orbiting earth from a million miles away.

Using its Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) which is trained on the planet, DSCOVR has beamed back three thousand images documenting 365 days of earth’s rotation as it makes an orbit of the sun.

Silicon Republic reports:

Earth from space

Situated at a location known as ‘Lagrange point 1’, DSCOVR is currently resting between the twin gravitational pulls of Earth and the Sun.

Taking a new batch of pictures – at different wavelengths – every two hours, the resulting images are accurate enough to show a solar eclipse march across the planet earlier this year.

Each picture on its own reveals little, but, when combined to offer colouring “the way a human would see the planet from DSCOVR” the results are obvious.

The composite images capture the ever-changing motion of clouds and weather systems, and the fixed features of Earth such as deserts, forests and the distinct blues of different seas.

Weather monitor

EPIC’s imagery will ultimately allow scientists to monitor weather and environmental incidents on an extremely macro scale.

EPIC will allow scientists to monitor ozone and aerosol levels in Earth’s atmosphere, as well as cloud height, vegetation properties and the ultraviolet reflectivity of Earth.

DSCOVR was launched into orbit in February last year, during one of SpaceX’s many trial and error attempts to land a rocket back on Earth from space.


NASA

Astronaut Photography from Space Helped ‘Discover the Earth’. Credit: NASA

Edmondo Burr

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