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New Drug Proves Effective Against AIDS In Trials With Monkeys

Scientists developing new prototype HIV drug, eCD4-Ig, have said that it has so far proved very effective in shielding monkeys against AIDS in tests being conducted.  

Yahoo News report:

Macaque monkeys given the drug were able to fend off high, repeated doses of the simian version of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), they reported in the journal Nature.

“We… show a way to achieve long-lived, effective vaccine-like protection from HIV 1,” the main group of viral strains in humans, said study leader Michael Farzan, a professor at the Scripps Research Institute in Florida.

The prototype drug, called eCD4-Ig, comprises two imitations of the receptors, or docking points, where HIV latches on to CD4 cells — the key defences of the immune cells.

The mimics latch on to the virus, tricking it into prematurely launching the docking procedure.

The virus can only execute the procedure once, rendering it unable to attach to CD4 cells thereafter.

The scientists likened the effect to closing the door to an intruder and tossing away the key.

The drug provides “very, very strong protection,” Farzan told AFP by email.

The paper reported on a 40-week experiment which showed that inoculated animals thrived even after being injected with four times the dose needed to infect macaques in a “control” group.

Further research, to be unveiled at a conference in Seattle next week, found that the treated macaques “continue to be protected from eight times and 16 times the infectious dose, more than a year after inoculation,” Farzan said.

The search for a vaccine has been one of the most frustrating chapters of the AIDS saga.

Traditional antibody-based candidate vaccines have failed to put up more than a partial shield, partly because of mutations in the stealthy virus.

The new prototype formula, though, targets sites on the virus’ so-called Env entry protein that are “highly conserved” — a scientific term meaning that these sites do not mutate very much.

Lab-dish tests have found that the drug also works on human HIV, which is very close to simian version of the virus.

“Of course, we still need to do further safety studies in both macaques and humans,” before any trials can take place, Farzan stressed.