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Portugal’s Government Ousted By Anti-Austerity Opposition

Government is ousted by leftist opposition amid huge austerity backlash

Portugal's government

Portugal’s government has been bought down amid austerity backlash.

Despite being sworn in only two weeks ago, the pro-austerity government has been forced to resign by a leftist anti-austerity block

Backed by mass public anger, proposals to continue austerity policies were blocked in parliament, forcing the government to dissolve.

AP reports: The government*s dramatic collapse came less than two weeks after it was sworn in and raised questions about debt-heavy Portugal*s commitment to the fiscal discipline demanded of countries sharing the euro currency.

The moderate Socialist Party forged an unprecedented alliance with the Communist Party and the radical Left Bloc to get a 122-seat majority in the 230-seat Parliament, which it used to vote down the proposals.

The defeat brought the government’s automatic resignation. The government’s fall was also a political setback for the 19-nation eurozone’s austerity strategy.

The policy of cutbacks was demanded by Germany and the others as a remedy for the bloc*s recent financial crisis. Eurozone leaders had pointed to Portugal, and Ireland, as examples of how austerity paid off as their economies improved.

Now, the progress Portugal made is in doubt, and some fear the country could go down the same road as Greece, which has needed three bailouts since 2010.

The triumph of the leftist alliance will likely give heart to anti-austerity forces in much bigger neighbor Spain, where a general election is scheduled for Dec. 20.

After four years in power the government lost its parliamentary majority in an Oct. 4 general election, which saw a public backlash against austerity measures adopted following a 78 billion-euro ($84 billion) bailout in 2011.

Socialist leader Antonio Costa is expected to become prime minister in coming weeks, supported by the Communists and Left Bloc. Costa criticized the government for being “submissive” in its dealings with the rest of Europe and making more cutbacks than those demanded by the bailout creditors. “The Portuguese want change,” he said.

Outside Parliament, demonstrators at an anti-austerity protest by labor groups shouted “Victory!” as the news of the vote spread.

Anti-austerity supporters are already celebrating the fall of the right-wing administration