Queen Elizabeth Infected With HIV In New Sacha Baron Cohen Film

Sacha Baron Cohen’s latest movie about football hooligans from Grimsby features a storyline in which the Queen of England is infected with the HIV virus. 

The storyline, which may or may not make it to the final cut, portrays Her Majesty becoming infected with HIV after a child with the virus is assassinated, splattering her with the blood of the child and thus causing her to contract the virus.

Mr Cohen is no stranger to controversy and shock tactics, and the films shocking scene is likely to receive a huge backlash from HIV and AIDS organisations who have already slammed the film as being ‘inaccurate’. report:

The Sun reports there is still some doubt over whether the gruesome scene will make the final cut of the film, which is due out next year.

A source told the paper: ‘Nothing would surprise you with Sacha’s comedy, but the scene with the Queen is bleak. It’s more gruesome than anything he has done before.’

Suzi Price from the National AIDS Trust said: ‘HIV can only be passed on by blood if it enters an open-wound, or in significant amounts, a mucus membrane.

‘Even then it is extremely unlikely, alongside the fact that any child living with HIV in the UK would almost definitely be on HIV treatment and therefore unable to pass the virus on.

‘The fact that HIV is used in this context, for shock value, is testimony to that fact that HIV is still seen as a punchline.

‘The scene just wouldn’t work and wouldn’t garner this controversy if the Queen found out she had another long-term condition, such as diabetes or asthma.

‘I hope if this scene does make the final cut Sacha Baron Cohen finds a way to address some of these complexities, but I’m not holding my breath.’

In the film Mr Baron Cohen plays a football hooligan while is brother, played by Mark Strong, is a MI6 spy.

Mr Baron Cohen has already infuriated local politicians and residents of Grimsby with his portrayal of the town in his upcoming football-based film.

The British star, who is famous for his characters Ali G, Borat and Bruno has caused fury among many within the seaside resort for his portrayal the town and its residents.

‘The gang of supporters from Grimsby are all enormous and revolting,’ Maurice Maree, who worked on the film, told the Sunday Times.

Local politicians have been outraged by the casting and the film’s negative portrayal of the town.

‘Why pick on us? There are other places where obesity is a problem where they’ve got a rough deal. Why is Grimsby picked on all the time,’ Austin Mitchell MP told MailOnline.

‘I know it’s a joke but I haven’t seen these fat ladies anywhere – if they were so fat they wouldn’t fit through the turnstiles at the stadium.

‘You can find fat ladies anywhere, we don’t have an accumulation of them. We have the problems of a town which needs more development and jobs and its lost its basic industry.

That’s something to be helped and not made fun of. It creates a very damaging image.’


Previously, councillor Matthew Brown told MailOnline he was ‘disappointed’ with the film.

‘It is using the town’s name in potentially a poor light. What also worries me is that there is no benefit to the local economy which is carrying the town’s name.

‘Anything that you associate with football hooliganism is going to be negative, but I hope people will be open-minded when they watch the film.

He added that depicting Grimsby as a town which has a history of football violence is wrong.

‘My view is quite simple. We don’t have a massive issue with hooliganism. There is very good stewarding at the ground. In general we are not in the same category as other clubs like Millwall who have a history of it.’

Among the women chosen to depict fans of Grimsby Town FC is Rebel Wilson, famed for her roles Bridesmaids and Pitch Perfect in which she plays a character called Fat Amy.

The Australian actress is seen locking lips with Baron Cohen in one scene, while his real-life wife, Isla Wilson, reportedly fills another on-screen role.

Grimsby is scheduled for release in 2015 and see Sacha take on the role of a dimwit supporter of lower league team Grimsby Town.

But while the town’s representatives have been left disappointed by the way it is portrayed, residents have taken a more lighthearted approach.

‘Should be good, there’s no such thing as bad publicity,’ one said online, while another said Mr Mitchell ‘had no sense of humour’.

MailOnline has contacted the film’s production companies for comment.