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Supreme Court: Medical Marijuana In Any Form Is Legal

Canada’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that medical marijuana patients can consume marijuana and smoke it – as well as use any other derivative they like.

The ruling against the federal government expands the definition of medical marijuana beyond the dried form.

Cbc.ca reports:

The country’s highest court found the current restriction to dried marijuana violates the right to liberty and security “in a manner that is arbitrary and hence is not in accord with the principles of fundamental justice.”

Restricting medical access to marijuana to a dried form has now been declared “null and void” — Sections 4 and 5 of the Controlled Drug and Substances Act, which prohibits possession and trafficking of non-dried forms of cannabis, will no longer be in effect.

The respondent in this case, Owen Smith, called it “a very emotional day.”

“I’m proud and really happy today for all those people who are going to benefit from this ruling,” he said at a press conference in Victoria, B.C.

The decision upholds earlier rulings by lower courts in British Columbia that said they went against a person’s right to consume medical marijuana in the form they choose.

Many users felt smoking it was even potentially harmful. However, methods such as brewing marijuana leaves in tea or baking cannabis into brownies left patients vulnerable to being charged with possession and trafficking under the law.

According to evidence submitted to the trial judge, it came down to forcing a person to choose between a legal but inadequate treatment, and an illegal but more effective choice.

“Imagine smoking seven grams of cannabis when you’re having a migraine so bad that just moving your fingers is excruciating pain,” he said during a scrum outside the Supreme Court.

“Taking a [cannabis] pill is a lot more sensible and having pills stocked in my cupboard makes a lot more sense than having just raw cannabis out and about in my house.”

The federal government, however, isn’t pleased.

“Frankly, I’m outraged by the Supreme Court,” said Health Minister Rona Ambrose.

“Let’s remember, there’s only one authority in Canada that has the authority and the expertise to make a drug into a medicine and that’s Health Canada,” she said during a press conference.

The case stems from Smith’s 2009 arrest in Victoria.

The club delivers medical marijuana products to its members, but doesn’t have a licence to produce it.

At his trial, Smith argued that the law under which he was charged was unconstitutional and violated Section 7 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which guarantees the right to life, liberty and security of the person.

The British Columbia trial judge agreed and acquitted him. A B.C. Appeal Court also ruled in Smith’s favour, under the principle that no one can be convicted of an offence under an unconstitutional law.

The federal government then appealed that decision to take his case to Canada’s top court. Thursday’s decision affirms Smith’s acquittal.

The Appeal Court had also suspended its declaration for a year to give Parliament time to rewrite the law. The Supreme Court has now deleted that suspension, saying otherwise it would “leave patients without lawful medical treatment and the law and law enforcement in limbo.”

Ambrose said the federal government will fight against the court’s “normalization” of marijuana.

“We will continue to combat it. We will continue our anti-drug strategy, we will target youth with the message that marijuana pot is bad for them,” the minister said. “We’ll continue to work with medical authorities across the country to make sure they’re involved in the message.”

  • Andrew

    How is this even relevant anymore. For f*cks sake people, it’s 2015! Why do we continue to elect these prehistoric, troglodytic, uneducated conservatives to make OUR laws??? Society is failing itself, please read and learn more. Then implore that everyone around you does the same.

  • Just Ice

    Thank the powers that be that pharma doesn’t dictate the court’s decision.

    • Tom Campbell

      This time, maybe. But I suspect they have stuck their oar in with any politician with a need for a sponsor, ie, a bunch of cash. Pharma’s big problem is how to monopolise and charge $100 per atom for a weed that anybody can grow.

  • Tom Campbell

    “Let’s remember, there’s only one authority in Canada that has the authority and the expertise to make a drug into a medicine and that’s Health Canada,” she said during a press conference.

    There are armies of people with the expertise, how come only one bunch have any authority. If Health Minister Rona Ambrose is outraged, it demonstrates yet again the ignorance of many politicians still wallowing in the mud of LIES Anslinger left behind.

  • Brinnananda

    And, in 2016, Trudeau promises to legalize it all around, beginning January 2017. What a difference a year makes.