The Dementor Wasps That Turn Cockroaches Into Zombies

Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling recently retweeted a photo of what has been nicknamed the “dementor wasp”. 

Also known as the “soul-sucking dementor” – the wasp got its name due to the sooty, skeletal, flying ‘dementor’ characteristics it displays with its unique ability to turn its victims into a zombie.

“A. dementor hunts cockroaches, injecting a venom into the mass of neurons on its prey’s belly that turns the roach into a passive zombie,” the World Wildlife Fund wrote in a statement.

“Cockroach wasp venom blocks receptors of the neurotransmitter octopamine, which is involved in the initiation of spontaneous movement.” reports:

The roach loses control of its movements, as though it were stoned drunk, and the wasp schlepps it off to a quiet place where it feasts upon it.

The spine-chilling hunting method piqued the imagination of museum goers, who found it befitting of the Harry Potter ghoul’s name.

A PR hit

The naming contest in May 2014 was a piece of publicity intended to generate more public interest in the discovery.

“I am convinced that events like this increase people’s curiosity about local and global fauna and nature,” said researcher Michael Ohl, who worked on the contest. He hoped it would garner more attention for conservation efforts.

It worked.

Though the bug was one of 139 new species discovered in the Mekong last year, including one new mammal, the “dementor” moniker got quick media coverage — though some of the other animals discovered were perhaps, well, way cooler.

After all, other wasps also sting their prey into paralysis — albeit with a less dramatic effect.

Long-fanged bat

That mammal, for example, was a bat with shark-like choppers. That got it the name “Long-Fanged Bat,” in science Latin “Hypsugo dolichodon.”

There was even another insect that could have easily upstaged the new wasp — an almost two-foot long stick bug, the second largest insect on record. Its name, “Phryganistria heusii yentuensis,” doesn’t exactly glide off the tip of the tongue.

Also, who hasn’t heard of a “stick bug” already?

“Color-Changing Thorny Frog” is a catchy name, and it has a cool survival gimmick, too. At night, “Gracixalus lumarius” is pink and yellow, but during the day its back turns a dull brown to camouflage it.

The bent-toed gecko probably got some kind of a door prize. Not for the name but for becoming exactly the 10,000th reptile species known to science, according to the WWF.

But with the Harry Potter name, the “Soul-Sucking Dementor” made top-ten lists and headed up the WWF’s roster of the 139 new discoveries. When the WWF tweeted it out at J.K. Rowling (@jk_rowling), she retweeted it the same day.

It’s hard for any other creature alive to beat that branding.