UK Police Found Guilty Of Infiltrating Activist Groups

The Metropolitan police have been found guilty of infiltrating UK activist groups

Seven British women have been awarded substantial damages and an apology from the Metropolitan Police, after a court found the police service guilty of gross privacy violations. Details emerged during the case that several officers had infiltrated an activist group the women belonged to, and formed intimate relationships with them as part of their undercover operation. 

The apology, in which the Met admit they were “abusive, deceitful, manipulative and wrong”, comes four years after the women launched legal action against the force. reports:

Since the exposure of undercover police officer Mark Kennedy in 2009, evidence that the Metropolitan Police sanctioned officers to sleep with targets has mounted. Kennedy spent seven years living as eco-activist Mark Stone after infiltrating a close-knit group of environmental activists. Despite being married, those in the movement claim the undercover cop had numerous sexual relationships over the years, which were a systematic means of gathering intelligence.

Another undercover officer, Bob Lambert, had relationships with four women while pretending to be an animal rights and environmental activist in the 1980s.

Some of the abusive and indefensible relationships which targeted political movements in the U.K.bore children.

On Friday, Police chiefs released a statement apologising unreservedly to the seven women who were deceived into forming “abusive and manipulative” long-term relationships with undercover officers.

Undisclosed, substantial amounts of compensation have also been paid those duped into the immoral and intimate relationships with undercover spies — some lasting up to nine years.

On Friday, the Metropolitan Police Service published the full apology after it was given to the seven women in person.

“Thanks in large part to the courage and tenacity of these women in bringing these matters to light it has become apparent that some officers, acting undercover whilst seeking to infiltrate protest groups, entered into long-term intimate sexual relationships with women which were abusive, deceitful, manipulative and wrong,” Assistant Commissioner Martin Hewitt said, as part of the settlement.

“I acknowledge that these relationships were a violation of the women’s human rights, an abuse of police power and caused significant trauma. I unreservedly apologise on behalf of the Metropolitan Police Service. I am aware that money alone cannot compensate the loss of time, their hurt or the feelings of abuse caused by these relationships,” he added.

The statement acknowledged that the women were deceived and suffered gross privacy violations in a situation that “may well have reflected attitudes towards women that should have no part in the culture of the Metropolitan Police.”

It said officers preyed on the women’s good nature and manipulated their emotions gratuitously and added that the subsequent trauma and secrecy left the women at risk of further abuse and deception by the officers, even after the deployment ended.

Responding to the apology, the women said: “No amount of ‘sorry’, or financial compensation, can make up for what we and others have endured, we are pleased the police have been forced to acknowledge the abusive nature of these relationships and that they should never happen.”

The relationships — which span a period of nearly 25 years — had remained hidden until they begun to be exposed by a series of media reports in 2010. By linking the cases together, a clear pattern of abusive and discriminatory behaviour towards women was revealed, which pointed to institutionalised sexism by the Metropolitan Police.

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