Mandatory Eye Scans & Finger Prints Required To Buy Food & Use Basic Services In India

India has the world’s largest domestic biometric identification system.

Big brother in India now requires all of  its 1.3 billion residents to have their fingerprints, eyes and faces scanned in order to access public services like schools, grocery stores, welfare benefits and banks

The Indian government has made registration mandatory for hundreds of public services and many private ones, from taking school exams to opening bank accounts.

Citizens have also been ordered to link their IDs to their cellphone and bank accounts.

Civil libertarians are outraged, saying the program, called Aadhaar, is Orwell’s Big Brother brought to life.

Collective Evolution reports:

Tracking the global citizenry is nothing new, especially since the Edward Snowden leaks came out showing that the monitoring of civilians is truly global. All of our actions are monitored, and everything is tracked, and when we ask why, we’re told that it’s for the sake of ‘national security.’ Every-time that word pops up in my writing, I feel deeply inclined to share this particular sentiment from John F. Kennedy:

“The dangers of excessive and unwarranted concealment of pertinent facts, far outweigh the dangers that are cited to justify it….There is  very grave danger than an announced need for increased security, will be ceased upon by those anxious to expand it’s meaning to the very limits of censorship and concealment. That I do not tend to permit, so long as it’s in my control.”

The justifications for their actions are not always as they’re told in press or media. This new move from India that requires all citizens to have their fingers printed and eyes scanned to use public services likely has ulterior motives. It’s similar to not being able to send your child to public school if they’re not vaccinated. Do as we say or don’t get basic public services.

As the New York Times points out:

“Technology has given governments around the world new tools to monitor their citizens. In China, the government is rolling out ways to use facial recognition and big data to track people, aiming to inject itself further into everyday life. Many countries, including Britain, deploy closed-circuit cameras to monitor their populations….But India’s program is in a league of its own, both in the mass collection of biometric data and in the attempt to link it to everything — traffic tickets, bank accounts, pensions, even meals for undernourished schoolchildren.”

Obviously, Indian citizens have already been criticizing the news, saying that the government will gain complete access into the lives of all citizens. This is a big problem, and something that has existed for a long time, I point you again to the Snowden links mentioned above, but whistle-blowers before Snowden exposed these types of things well before he did. William Binney is one of multiple examples.

What’s the justification for such action? According to Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, it’s simply a universal, easy to use ID, that will “reduce this country’s endemic corruption and help bring even the most illiterate into the digital age.”

Nandan Nilekani, the billionaire who was contracted by the government to build the system nearly 10 years ago, told the New York Times that, “It’s the equivalent of building interstate highways… If the government invested in building a digital public utility and that is made available as platform, then you actually can create major innovations around that.”

This isn’t far too different than proposals that’ve been made, by some very prominent people, to actually chip the entire citizenry to make it convenient for one to access their license, bankcard or passport. Multiple corporations are pushing to microchip the human race. In fact, microchip implants in humans are already on the market.

For example, an American company called Applied Digital Solutions (ADS) has developed one approximately the size of a grain of rice, and has already had it approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for distribution and implementation.