Planned Parenthood Now Offers Sex Changes To Minors

Planned Parenthood offers sex changes to children

Planned Parenthood is now offering transgender “hormone therapy” for young children in seventeen states across the U.S.

According to their 2016-17 annual report, Planned Parenthood management are concerned that some youth feel their gender “doesn’t match…the gender that they feel they are inside.”

Contrary to the findings of psychiatrists around the world, Planned Parenthood defiantly teaches parents that “the mismatch between a person’s body and gender identity isn’t in itself a mental illness.”

While other transgender hormone dispensing clinics require a therapist’s letter for giving out the body-altering drugs, Planned Parenthood does not.

The organization’s policy is to simply inform gender dysphoric youth of the risks of treatment. When the patient acknowledges having been told the risks, treatment begins.

According to one of the world’s top surgeons, gender reassignment surgery and hormone therapy is both medically dangerous and unethical.

Professor Miroslav Djordjevic, the world-leading genital reconstructive surgeon, claims that the majority of transgender patients immediately regret their gender reassignment decision, and come to him to reverse it shortly afterwards:

Prof Djordjevic, who is an expert in urology with 22 years experience of genital reconstructive surgery, operates under strict guidelines. Before any surgery takes place, he requires patients to undergo psychiatric evaluation for a minimum of between one and two years, followed by a hormonal evaluation and therapy. He also requests two professional letters of recommendation for each person and attempts to remain in contact for as long as possible following the surgery. Currently, he estimates he still speaks with almost 80 per cent of his former patients.

Following conversations with those upon whom he has helped detransition, Prof Djordjevic says he has real concerns about the level of psychiatric evaluation and counselling that people receive elsewhere before gender reassignment first takes place.

Such worries were echoed in an interview given by an anonymous transgender person to the Guardian earlier this year, in which they expressed their regret at transitioning and called for greater emphasis on counselling, with surgery promoted as the very last resort: “Had that been the case for me, I might not have transitioned. I was so focused on trying to change my gender, I never stopped to think about what gender meant.”

Prof Djordjevic also admits he has deep reservations about treating children with hormonal drugs before they reach puberty – not least as by blocking certain hormones before they have sufficiently developed means they may find it difficult to undergo reassignment surgery in the future.

“Ethically, we have to help any person over the world starting from three to four years of age, but in the best possible way,” he says. “If you change general health with any drug, I’m not a supporter of that theory.”

These are profoundly life-changing matters around which he – like many in his industry – feel far better debate is required to promote new understanding.