Create A Bitcoin Address With High School Calculator

TI-89 Calculator
TI-89 Calculator

You can now create a Bitcoin address using a TI-89 science Calculator used in High School.

There is no backdoor vulnerability when you’re offline and not using a computer. It’s the definition of a cold wallet.

Matt Whitlock explains: I wrote a program for the TI-89 graphing calculator to read die rolls from the user, convert them into a Bitcoin private key via base conversion, and derive the public Bitcoin address. Elliptic-curve point multiplication is dog slow on the TI-89’s Motorola 68000 processor, but it’s just math, so of course it still works. (The computation of the public key is shown in this video at 10x speed.)
The program in written in C for the TIGCC compiler.

Bitcoin diceware on a TI-89 graphing calculator from whitslack on Vimeo.

Mother Board reports: Matt Whitlock, who helped make one of the world’s first Bitcoin ATMs, is at it again. In a video posted on to Vimeo, he showed how using the calculator once only used for high school geometry and a 12-sided die makes a secure address for your Bitcoin account.

The video self-explanatory. Load up your calculator with the code, roll it 72 times and enter the number rolled into it. After that, the calculator pumps out a private key and address.

We’ve reached out to Whitlock to see what the purpose of this is, but someone on Reddit might have already pointed out the obvious factor: it’s secure because it never connects with a “NSA backdoored” computer when generating it.