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WikiLeaks Reveals First Batch Of Obama Emails

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Whistle-blowing website Wikileaks has released a batch of emails that it says comes from U.S. president Barack Obama.

The hacked emails come from president Obama’s secret email address, bobama@ameritech.com.

RT.com reports:

The first batch from Wikileaks are searchable under the email address bobama@ameritech.net, an email account Barack Obama was possibly using before winning the election in November 2008.

Among them is an email, dated October 30, 2008, from John Podesta to Senator Obama, with a confidential attachment, discussing an economic transition team, mapping out why Obama needs to get it up and running before his term begins in January 2009.

Paulson and his subordinates do not believe they can responsibly defer until after January 20 significant decisions concerning both the use of TARP funds and other potential stabilizing measures,” it says.

The latest batch of emails are culled from a series of deals involving Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. Podesta is a long-term associate of the Clintons and was President Bill Clinton’s Chief of Staff from 1998 to 2001, and Hillary Clinton’s campaign Chair. Podesta also served as Counselor to President Barack Obama.

Other emails to “bobama@ameritech.net” do not appear to have generated a reply from the future president.

In one email sent at 7:39 p.m. on election night in 2008, Podesta emails Obama with some last-minute thoughts on the upcoming G20 meeting. “I don’t want to bug you today,” Podesta wrote. “The memo pasted below concerns a possible invitation to the G20 meeting on November 15.”

That email would have reached Obama just 21 minutes before the major television networks called the election in his favor, making him the next president of the United States.

On the chance that President Bush would raise this with you tonight, I wanted you to be aware that it is the unanimous recommendation for your advisors that you NOT attend. As long as you are aware of that, we can review the contents of the memo tomorrow.

In the memo, staffers weighed the pros and cons of accepting an invitation to the G20, if it were extended. On one hand, the meeting just 11 days after the election would “afford you an early and efficient opportunity to evaluate the positions of leaders from other economically important countries,” they wrote.

Edmondo Burr

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